International Association of Hydrogeologists - Groundwater and society : 60 years of IAH

43rd IAH CONGRESS
25-29th September, 2016

le Corum , Montpellier, France

IAH/AIH

Follow us

NAVIGATION

Main Topics and definitive sessions

The sessions of Congress

The eight topics of the Congress were animated by specialists of each scientific field who proposed several “Provisional Sessions” during the abstract submission process. The definitive list of the Congress’ "sessions" was progressively completed till the end of the abstract submission and selection process.
During the Congress, each “session” comprises:
- oral presentations during parallel session(s);
- oral flash presentation of several posters of the “session” during plenary sessions;
- at least one e-poster session.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

TOPIC 1 - WHAT ROLE DO OR SHOULD HYDROGEOLOGISTS PLAY IN OUR SOCIETIES?

Session 1.03: Sharing groundwater knowledge

TOPIC 2 - HYDROGEOLOGY(ISTS) AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Session 2.01: Groundwater in semiarid regions – a long-term view on changes in aquifer balances. Hydrogeology in developing countries.
Session 2.02: Groundwater for sustainable water supplies in developing countries

TOPIC 3 - HYDROGEOLOGISTS FOR THE FUTURE: INFORMATION, EXCHANGE, EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Session 3.01: Groundwater data in the New Digital Age

TOPIC 4 - ECONOMICS IN GROUNDWATER AND GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT

Session 4.01: Innovative economic instruments and institutions for achieving sustained groundwater use. Integrated socio-economic and biophysical modeling for groundwater and conjunctive use management

TOPIC 5 - GROUNDWATER, AND GLOBAL & CLIMATE CHANGE

Session 5.01: Groundwater resources in a world facing climate change
Session 5.02: Groundwater and global change
Session 5.03: CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers and potential impacts on shallow aquifers
Session 5.04: Emerging contaminants in the water cycle and risk to Groundwater
Session 5.05: Groundwater and Ecosystems – Hydrological role of forests and wetlands

TOPIC 6 - ACTIVE MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER IN THE WATER CYCLE

Session 6.01: Managed Aquifer Recharge
Session 6.02: Treated WasteWater REUSE for groundwater recharge: addressing the challenge
Session 6.03: Innovative tools to improve understanding of groundwater recharge processes

TOPIC 7 - GROUNDWATER USES AND MANAGING GROUNDWATER USE CONFLICTS

Session 7.01: Groundwater and Energy Resources
Session 7.02: Urban Hydrogeology
Session 7.03: Agricultural and sanitation contaminants and implications for water services and health
Session 7.04: Groundwater and man-made underground works
Session 7.05: The Challenges for Transboundary aquifer management
Session 7.06: Groundwater protection and governance: examples of groundwater protection models, and the role of the private sector
Session 7.07: Transdisciplinary and participatory approaches in groundwater research and management

TOPIC 8 - PROGRESS IN CONCEPTUAL MODELS, TOOLS AND METHODS

Session 8.01: Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing as an innovative method in hydrogeology and geothermal energy
Session 8.02: Groundwater Development and Protection in Coastal and Volcanic Environments with Complex Geological Structures
Session 8.03: Geometrical structure and hydrogeological properties of Hard-Rock aquifers.
Session 8.04: Isotopic and residence time tracers
Session 8.05: Karst aquifers
Session 8.06: Verification of conceptual patterns and expected natural effects of regional groundwater flow by interpretation of relevant field observations
Session 8.07: Hydrogeophysics: innovative non-invasive technologies for groundwater resources exploitation and management
Session 8.08: Mineral and Thermal water: an indicator of deep processes and source of economically valuable minerals
Session 8.09: Hydrogeoecology: a focus on groundwater ecology
Session 8.10: Recent developments in groundwater modeling and mathematical tools in Hydrogeology
Session 8.11: Hydrogeodesy: new surface tools to characterize and monitor active and managed groundwater systems

KINDRA

 

TOPIC 1 - WHAT ROLE DO OR SHOULD HYDROGEOLOGISTS PLAY IN OUR SOCIETIES?

Session 1.03: Sharing groundwater knowledge
The diffusion of hydrogeological knowledge and its uncertainty is more than ever a critical issue at a time when global changes critically affect the environment and natural resources. Hydrogeologists have the responsibility of being stewards of groundwater and watersheds, communicators, and educators.  They, in fact, play an important role in society in characterizing and protecting water, hopefully providing information and opinions to users, regulators and decision makers.  How is the message shared, understood, and used?  This, in a context where there are many challenges:  technical, societal, political.  This session will provide examples of situations in the Himalayas, India, New-Zealand, Canada, and France.

Conveners: Massuel Sylvain (IRD, France, sylvain.massuel@ird.fr), Gilles Wendling (GW Solutions, Canada, gw@gwsolutions.ca)

TOPIC 2 - HYDROGEOLOGY(ISTS) AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Session 2.01: Hydrogeology in developing countries. Groundwater in semiarid regions – a long-term view on changes in aquifer balances
Aquifers represent a key resource for the economic development of semiarid regions due to (i) relatively higher volume and larger extent of groundwater compared to surface water, and ii) lower sensitivity of groundwater resources to short time scale climate variability.
Over the past decades groundwater recharge and discharge rates have dramatically changed in these regions as a consequence of the numerous forms of global change like modifications of land use and land cover, increased pumping (irrigation, domestic water), hydraulic works, and wet and dry climate cycles.
This session will focus on multidecadal evolution of aquifer balances, with a focus on:
- direct (water table surveys) and indirect (vadose zone, environmental tracers) evidence of these changes,
- quantitative and qualitative consequences in terms of biophysical processes and exploitation by populations,
- impacts on accuracy and reliability of groundwater models at various scales, especially with respect to potential future changes.

Conveners: Favreau G. (IRD, France, guillaume.favreau@ird.fr), Leduc Chr. (IRD, France, christian.leduc@ird.fr), Scanlon B. (University of Texas at Austin, USA, bridget.scanlon@beg.utexas.edu)

Session 2.02: Groundwater for sustainable water supplies in developing countries
Increasing water demand for sustaining human activities is raising severe concerns worldwide, and particularly in developing countries where the access to water is already poor. To support developing countries moving out of poverty, adequate and safe water supply is a priority, and developing groundwater is often the best solution due to its dispersed occurrence and its ability to buffer climate variability. However, sustainably developing and managing groundwater supplies requires knowledge about aquifer systems and groundwater chemistry and how they respond to stresses from climate, abstraction, land use change and contamination.
This session focuses on groundwater supplies in developing countries and aims to discuss: (1) the contribution of groundwater to domestic and agricultural needs; (2) new approaches for improving knowledge on groundwater availability and renewability; (3) current and future challenges of increasing groundwater supply in developing countries; and (4) the opportunities of developing participative approaches for long-term sustainable management.

Conveners: Jean-Michel Vouillamoz (IRD-LTHE, France - Direction Générale de l'Eau, Benin, Jean-Michel.Vouillamoz@ird.fr), Viviana Re (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy – National Engineering School of Sfax, Tunisia, re@unive.it), Alan MacDonald (British Geological Survey, United Kingdom, amm@bgs.ac.uk)

 

TOPIC 3 - HYDROGEOLOGISTS FOR THE FUTURE: INFORMATION, EXCHANGE, EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Session 3.01: Groundwater data in the New Digital Age
Emerging from the digital revolution, we have entered an era of unprecedented change and opportunity in which it is estimated that the global volume of digital data doubles every two years.  This data deluge can now provide hydrogeologists and citizens with place-based information on demand, and hence encourage a deeper understanding, consideration and appreciation of our global groundwater systems.  Ubiquitous internet technologies provide access to all this data, particularly when that information is delivered on demand via high speed broadband to mobile tablet devices.  These technologies have created a society that is spatially enabled and aware.  Big business and citizens increasingly expect to be able to access past and current information about any location of interest, to find answers to their spatial queries.  Deeper appreciation and understanding comes from the sheer volume of information that can be amassed about any particular place in the landscape, and how that information can be dynamically synthesised to provide the most definitive answer to the user's question.  Hence the use of spatial digital technologies for a more holistic understanding of groundwater systems and environmental sustainability are rapidly emerging. 
This session invites contributions that showcase examples of groundwater data management, mobile applications (Apps) for hydrogeologists and e-research developments that will transform the way we utilise groundwater data. Examples may demonstrate interoperable technologies that can dynamically federate data from disparate databases, or internet portals developed for citizen contributed observations and monitoring data. New technological developments are supporting novel and more efficient methods for data collection and processing, visualization and communication, with crowdsourcing. These opportunities make reflecting upon the challenges and opportunities of citizen science, especially in a context of a better knowledge for example in monitoring of groundwater resources.  Case histories could include sensor technologies, time-series legacy data, and visualisations of groundwater data together with other socio-economic and environmental data.  We particularly welcome examples where the access to big data has led to new discoveries in the data spawning novel applied research projects as well as industry investment and community engagement. 

Conveners: Peter Dahlhaus (Federation University Australia, p.dahlhaus@federation.edu.au), Laurence Chery and Sylvain Grellet (BRGM, France, l.chery@brgm.fr, s.grellet@brgm.fr)

 

TOPIC 4 - ECONOMICS IN GROUNDWATER AND GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT

Session 4.01: Innovative economic instruments and institutions for achieving sustained groundwater use. Integrated socio-economic and biophysical modeling for groundwater and conjunctive use management
Groundwater resources are increasingly being used intensively worldwide. While this allowed significant short term economic development, it also generated longer term negative environmental, social and economic impacts. Policy makers are increasingly aware of the need to implement policies that can ensure sustained groundwater through better control of groundwater abstraction. The approach generally consists of capping total water abstraction (based on hydrogeological studies) before allocating water entitlements to users or groups of users. This shift from an open access regime to one of regulated abstraction raises important economic questions which this session intends to investigate. On which basis should individual water entitlements be allocated to individual or groups of users, considering economic efficiency and social justice criteria? What mechanisms should be implemented to facilitate temporary or permanent reallocation of water among users? What different models are there for these reallocation schemes? What should be the relative role of the State and water users associations in monitoring and enforcing water allocation rules? What is the social acceptability of alternative policy options and how do stakeholders influence the policy reform process? What is the fundamental role of property rights and tenure arrangements to water and land in relation to groundwater?
This session is seeking contributions dealing with:
- Case studies describing recent policy development; we particularly welcome papers dealing with groundwater markets; the establishment of groundwater users associations; monitoring and enforcement problems; the political economy of groundwater policy reform; stakeholders’ engagement in such groundwater policy reform.
- The design of innovative economic instruments and associated institutions; the evaluation of their impact using economic models, experimental economics or participatory approaches.

Conveners: Jean-Daniel Rinaudo (BRGM, France, jd.rinaudo@brgm.fr), Guillermo Donoso (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, gdonosoh@uc.cl), Antony Jakeman (The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, Tony.Jakeman@anu.edu.au)

 

TOPIC 5 - GROUNDWATER, AND GLOBAL & CLIMATE CHANGE

Session 5.01: Groundwater resources in a world facing climate change
Groundwater is the world's most voluminous and best protected source of freshwater resource. It is used intensively supplying approximately half of the world’s drinking water supply and increasing proportion of that used for irrigation. The sustainability of groundwater use is therefore of rapidly growing importance to enhancing global food security. Groundwater also plays a vital role in sustaining surface flows and ecological function of groundwater-dependent ecosystems. Groundwater therefore needs to be managed wisely as outlined in major regulatory initiatives such as the European Water Framework Directive. This is, in itself, a challenge under changing environments, climates, land uses, and populations. This task is especially challenging in light of limited availability of data in many environments, both arid and humid.
In this topic we invite contributions, which particularly report on research on the consequences of climate change for future management, protection, and sustainable use of groundwater, as well as studies on detection and/or attribution of changes in groundwater in response to climate change. Methodologies, strategies, case studies as well as quantitative techniques for dealing with uncertainty and limited data availability are of interest for this session. Studies focusing on the impact of the adaptation strategies are also sought. Furthermore, contributions describing case studies and new techniques are welcome. The session is open to contributions focusing on methodology or results, including societal and economic impacts, from local to regional to global scales.

Conveners: Roland Barthel (University of Gothenburg, Sweden, roland.barthel@gvc.gu.se), Florence Habets (CNRS, Paris, France, florence.habets@upmc.fr), Richard Taylor (UCL, London, UK, richard.taylor@ucl.ac.uk)

Session 5.02: Groundwater and global change
The current pace of global environmental change across the world is unprecedented. These anthropogenic pressures (climate change, pumping, land use change, water diversion, urbanization, agricultural intensification, deforestation, mining, etc) can strongly impact on aquifers’ systems by: 1) altering water fluxes (e.g. recharge and discharge), 2) modifying surface and groundwater interactions, 3) leading to new hydrological processes, and 4) compromising the quality of groundwater resources. This session addresses the key scientific challenges associated with linking global change to the evolution of groundwater quantity and quality over the past 60 years. Of particular interest are studies looking at separating the impact of climate change (that is mostly addressed in session 5.01) from the effects of other anthropogenic activities. We welcome contributions from a variety of approaches including analysis of long-term time series (groundwater levels and water quality records), and modelling studies of past and future changes.

Conveners: Conveners: Marc Leblanc (Avignon University, France, marc.leblanc@univ-avignon.fr), Tales Carvalho Resende (UNESCO IHP, t.carvalho-resende@unesco.org), Maciek Lubczynski (University of Twente, ITC, Netherlands, m.w.lubczynski@utwente.nl)

Session 5.03: CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers and potential impacts on shallow aquifers
CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) is a key climate change mitigation technology. Geological storage of the CO2 captured at industrial facilities such as power plants, gas production, cement and steel plants is a promising approach for reducing CO2 atmospheric emissions and can even generate negative emissions when it is combined with CO2 capture at biomass plants (BECCS - BioEnergy with CCS), or directly from the atmosphere. Globally, there are 15 large-scale CCS projects in operation, with a further seven under construction. Deep saline aquifers constitute suitable widespread targets with a large overall storage capacity, thus enabling worldwide deployment of CCS. Depleted oil and gas fields are also suitable for storing CO2 and can offer an economic added value through the CO2-enhanced recovery of hydrocarbons.
In the present session, we seek contributions on both the use of deep saline aquifers for CO2 storage and potential impacts of CO2 storage on potable groundwater resources in the overlying shallow aquifers. Impacts could result from pressure perturbations or from leakage through faults or wellbores of the injected CO2, CO2 plus in situ compounds like H2S or hydrocarbons, or associated reservoir brines. We are particularly interested in studies highlighting preventive measures to limit potential impacts (such as characterization and monitoring) as well as research into assessing potential impacts via laboratory and controlled release field experiments. The session will also accept abstracts dealing with other issues relating to CO2 storage in the subsurface.

Conveners: Isabelle Czernichowski-Lauriol (BRGM/CO2GeoNet, France, i.czernichowski@brgm.fr) and Stan Beaubien (Sapienza University of Rome/CO2GeoNet, Italy, stanley.beaubien@uniroma1.it)

Session 5.04: Emerging contaminants in the water cycle and risk to Groundwater
Since the beginning of the 20th century, an increasing amount of compounds originating from human activities have been introduced in the water cycle, via diffuse or point-source pollution. Notably, massive amounts of man-made organic compounds have been released in the atmosphere, surface water or directly in the soil, during the last 50 years, including some very stable molecules. These compounds or their metabolites are now detected in all the water compartments, from rain to groundwater, thanks to the recent development of very sensitive analytical instruments and methodologies, and the better targeting of contaminants of interest.
This session is aiming at understanding which are the relevant compounds to be investigated in groundwater and the relevant associated parts of the water cycle, using reliable methodologies from sampling to analysis, in order to: (1) Assess the vulnerability of the aquifer; (2) Identify the sources of diffuse or point-source pollutions that may affect the current or future quality of groundwater; (3) Understand the contamination timeframe. We encourage contribution covering all the aspects from the choice of molecules, particularly as regard their tracers’ properties, origin (including rainwater), to methodologies, occurrence data and predictive approaches.

Conveners: L. Di Gioia (Danone Nutricia Research, France, Lodovico.di-gioia@danone.com), B. Lopez (BRGM, France, b.lopez@brgm.fr), D. Lapworth (BGS, UK, djla@bgs.ac.uk)

Session 5.05: Groundwater and Ecosystems - Hydrological role of forests and wetlands
Groundwater is particularly linked with some ecosystems such as wetlands. On the other hand, the forest ecosystems occupy large areas in the world.
Are forests beneficial or prejudicial to the functions and uses of water? Is it possible to concomitantly sustain forestry activities and to protect downstream water uses, particularly drinking water supply? For most scientists and practitioners, but also for a wider audience, woodland areas benefit from a very positive image. In fact, they often maintain or improve the quality of water resources, in addition to benefits for biodiversity, landscapes, and recreational activities, among others. Regarding the quantitative aspect of water resources, the issue is more often discussed with positive arguments for less runoff, and less floods and erosion, but also a decrease of water resource availability due to the higher evapotranspiration of forests in comparison with other landcovers.
Wetlands, and, more largely, surface-groundwater relationships also play a major role in the hydrological cycle. The quantitative and quality benefits, and impacts if any, of wetlands will be highlihted in this session as well as rules and case studies dealing with their maintenance and management.
This session seeks to answer these issues with hydrological, hydrogeological, and socio-economic contributions from the ecosystems, forestry, wetlands and water resource communities.

Conveners: Julien Fiquepron (CNPF, France, julien.fiquepron@cnpf.fr), Michel Lafforgue (Suez Consulting, France, michel.lafforgue@suez.com), Patrick Lachassagne (Water Institute by Evian, Danone Waters, patrick.lachassagne@danone.com)

TOPIC 6 - ACTIVE MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER IN THE WATER CYCLE

Session 6.01: Managed Aquifer Recharge
With a trend of increasing water demand and a decreasing availability of water resources, an increasing number of aquifers are overexploited. This can have critical consequences, more especially in coastal areas. This issue will become more important considering the potential impacts of global warming. One of the key options consists of intentionally recharging aquifers to stop/limit the deepening of the piezometric level and protecting environmental ecosystems of connected surface waters. It may be used to enhance recharge of rainwater or urban stormwater or as a complementary treatment prior to wastewater reuse. Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) needs to be operated effectively to produce these benefits and avoid problems. Technical issues, such as avoiding clogging, water quality deterioration, or unwanted discharge of stored water need to be addressed along with regulatory, cultural, and economic issues. With appropriate site selection and sound knowledge Managed Aquifer Recharge has become a highly effective water resources management tool.
In this session, contributions include hydrogeologic, hydraulic, and water quality aspects, both geochemical and microbiological, for a range of water types, (particularly urban sources). Both scientific advances and practical case studies are presented.

Conveners: Michel Lafforgue (Suez Consulting, France, michel.lafforgue@suez.com), Co-Chairs of IAH Commission on MAR: Peter Dillon, Australia, pdillon500@gmail.com, Enrique Fernández Escalante, Spain, efernan6@tragsa.es, and Weiping Wang, China, wangweipingwwp@126.com

Session 6.02: Treated WasteWater REUSE for groundwater recharge: addressing the challenge
Water scarcity and the overexploitation of conventional water resources are two of the main drivers to Treated WasteWater (TWW) Reuse. TWW groundwater recharge projects are blooming in the world especially in coastal areas and in the Mediterranean area where increasing pressures on the resource cause deep depletion and high salinization impacts. TWW can either be directly reinjected  or indirectly through dedicated infiltration basins as evidenced by several pilot facilities. This practice enables to restore groundwater in terms of quantity and quality, but also to limit salt intrusion and mitigate climate change impacts. TWW could then be pumped from the aquifers for indirect surface reuse like agricultural irrigation. Ground properties are used and considered as a way to improve TWW quality, while much attention is often paid to TWW quality (pathogens, salinity, etc.) prior to recharge to avoid groundwater contamination.
In this session, we are seeking contributions about feedback from pilot- to full-scale experiences on the risks and benefits of such practices regarding regulatory, environmental, social and sanitary conditions both on the qualitative and quantitative sides. This session will also focus on methodologies (cost-benefits Analysis, Life Cycle Analysis, environmental impact assessment…) and development of decision support tools to asses and design the TWW groundwater recharge as a success factor for the water circular economy.
WasteWater reuse is a topical but complex subject and we firmly believe we still need to learn from everyone experience to help build a framework that is suitable for the wide range of water reuse situation.

Conveners: Nicolas CONDOM (PhD, Ecofilae, www.ecofilae.fr, France, nicolas.condom@ecofilae.fr), Manuel SAPIANO (Water Policy Unit, SEWCU, Malta, manuel.sapiano@gov.mt), Rudy ROSSETTO (PhD, Institute of Life Sciences, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Italy, r.rossetto@sssup.it)

Session 6.03: Innovative tools to improve understanding of groundwater recharge processes
Improving the understanding of groundwater recharge and the ability to predict its sensibility to global change is crucial for a sustainable resource management. Several methods have been developed to investigate groundwater recharge, but it is highly variable in space and time, and large uncertainties remain on its quantification. This session aims at bringing together recent developments of the methods to quantify groundwater recharge at various spatial and temporal scales, as well as in various hydrogeological settings. We seek to gather contributions based on a variety of approaches, from geochemical or geophysical field investigations to integrated hydrogeological modeling.

Conveners: Sophie Guillon (Mines ParisTech, France, sophie.guillon@mines-paristech.fr), Florent Barbecot (Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada, barbecot.florent@uqam.ca), Hervé Jourde (Hydrosciences Montpellier, France, hjourde@univ-montp2.fr)

 

TOPIC 7 - GROUNDWATER USES AND MANAGING GROUNDWATER USE CONFLICTS

Session 7.01: Groundwater and Energy Resources
Groundwater and energy resource development are connected in a variety of ways. Contamination of shallow groundwater resources by oil and gas development has been an ongoing issue, with public concern increasing in recent years with the advent of hydraulic fracturing. Similar concerns about contamination have also been associated with nuclear energy. Potential impacts to groundwater quality from long-term waste disposal by the energy sector have also created significant concerns. The availability of groundwater is also affected by energy resource developments, which are often significant users of water. This has created competition between the energy sector and other water users. Use of brackish and saline groundwater by the energy sector has been increasing to alleviate this competition. Finally, the energy content of groundwater itself is of interest. Geothermal energy development is increasing in many parts of the world and these developments can have important interactions with other subsurface developments and groundwater systems. In this session, the interplay of the energy resource development and groundwater will be examined from a variety of perspectives including conventional and unconventional oil and gas development, biofuels, geothermal energy and nuclear energy.

Conveners: Grant Ferguson (University of Saskatchewan, grant.ferguson@usask.ca), Bridget Scanlon (Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, bridget.scanlon@beg.utexas.edu) and Philipp Blum (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, philipp.blum@kit.edu)

Session 7.02: Urban Hydrogeology
Urban groundwater is a resource under pressure, often subject to quantitative and qualitative deterioration. Urban land-use changes the water balance drastically and urban groundwater is threatened by overexploitation and contamination from a multitude of sources. More recently, urban groundwater has also become subject to geothermal use. This session encourages all contributions on urban groundwater use and management as well as on urban impacts on quantity and quality of groundwater and its receiving waters.

Conveners: Gudrun Massmann and Victoria Burke (Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Germany, gudrun.massmann@uni-oldenburg.de, victoria.burke@uni-oldenburg.de), Gesche Grützmacher (Berliner Wasserbetriebe, gesche.gruetzmacher@bwb.de), Ken W.F. Howard (University of Toronto, gwater@utsc.utoronto.ca), Helen Bonsor (British Geological Survey, UK, helnso@bgs.ac.uk)

Session 7.03: Agricultural and sanitation contaminants and implications for water services and health
Between a third and half of the world’s population depend on groundwater as their main drinking water supply. There is growing recognition that groundwater of high quality is not ubiquitous. Diffuse pollution by nitrates and pesticides is the main cause of groundwater quality degradation in many countries, and regions are affected by pathogens, which can cause health problems of differing severity. Such pollution is due to agricultural and livestock practices, as well as on-site sanitation and urban wastewater.
From the point of view of government and other agencies responsible for drinking water supply, methodologies to evaluate a degraded resource and how to regain quality are important. In rural and peri-urban settings, there is need to promote changes in agricultural practices to protect aquifers. This may require farmers to adopt new methods and accept different policies. Their willingness may depend on their awareness of the impact of their practices on water quality. Farmer unions often blame poor on-site sanitation or inadequate wastewater treatment for pollution. Clearly, there is need to discriminate between contamination sources.
Rural and peri-urban settings are not only managed by public agencies and are increasingly marked by investments in decentralized water services by water users themselves, particularly in boreholes for drinking water as well as on-site sanitation systems and reuse of wastewater. Consequently, the effects of bacteria and viruses are of increasing concern. In this context, there is need for drilling professionalism particularly regarding borehole siting, sanitary seals and groundwater quality surveillance. Promising technical solutions must be identified, based on the management by the user of water and soil. It is also necessary to understand user’s perception of decentralized services and ultimately improve water management policies. Diffuse pollution includes hydrocarbon, metal contaminants, organic micro-pollutants from chemicals used in a variety of products, most of which are from industrial origin. There are knock on effects of such contamination on health (e.g. endocrine disruption, thyroid or liver diseases, cancer) and associated costs for individuals and society.
Pathogens and pollutants tend to be systematically associated with sanitary deficiencies but may also vanish with natural attenuation, in the subsurface and through interaction with surface waters and river sediments.
This session explores complementary approaches to this increasingly important problem: sampling, biomonitoring, geochemistry, hydrodynamic integrated modeling, field surveys on the user’s practices and perception and experiments in management. Pollution sources, the fate of the contaminants and the effects of groundwater contamination on society are examined. The session will question the extent to which stakeholders face localized or diffuse pollution and the scale at which these challenges need to be solved.
It is becoming clear that groundwater quality is an interdisciplinary issue that spans the technical, social and political sciences. The authors of selected submissions will be invited to publish in a special issue of an international journal involved in interdisciplinary approaches of environmental issues.

Conveners: Olivier Fouché (Cnam - Ecole des Ponts, France, olivier.fouche@enpc.fr); Manuela Lasagna (Earth Sciences Department, Torino University, Italy, manuela.lasagna@unito.it); Kerstin Danert (Rural Water Supply Network, Skat Foundation, Switzerland, kerstin.danert@skat.ch); Chandrakant Jangam (CSIR - NEERI, Nagpur, India, chandu.jangam164@gmail.com); Behzad Nasri (Water Engineering Department, Urmia University, Iran, bezad61@yahoo.com), P. Hynds (DIT/ESHI, Ireland, hyndsp@tcd.ie).

Session 7.04: Groundwater and man-made underground works
This session focusses on underground facilities such as tunnels, underground storages, underground research laboratories or any other type of underground facilities. The main topics are more especially the impact on groundwater and changes of hydrogeolocical conditions around and towards the facility, mitigation in case of excess impact and possible cases of using groundwater as an ally for the facility operation.

Conveners: François Cabon (GEOSTOCK, Rueil-Malmaison, France, francois.cabon@geostock.fr), Alain Rouleau (Pr, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Québec, Canada, arouleau@uqac.ca)

Session 7.05: The Challenges for Transboundary aquifer management
In 2016, the UN General Assembly is due to decide the fate of the UN International Law Commissions’ Draft Articles on the Law of Transboundary Aquifers following the repeated postponing the decision. The Draft Articles, in whose development the IAH took the scientific lead, represent arguably the most authoritative international legal instrument that specifically addresses the governance of aquifers. At the start of the SDG’s, it is becoming imperative to ensure that there is adequate regulation over transboundary aquifers, as their integrity and surrounding ecosystems are threatened by over exploitation, land-use changes and pollution. The science behind these drivers needs to be made more explicit and prominent.
This session of the IAH Congress, in its 60th Anniversary year, calls for papers from the science, the law and social science fields, to come together and provide the background and the justification that could be submitted to the UN General Assembly in Nov 2016 on how the Draft Articles can be turned into an international instrument.

Conveners: Shammy Puri (Chair IAH Commission on Transboundary Aquifer, shammypuri@aol.com), Alice Aureli (Chief Groundwater Section, UNESCO-ISARM, a.aureli@unesco.org), Neno Kukuric (Director IGRAC, neno.kukuric@un-igrac.org), Karen Villholth (Principal Researcher and Coordinator of GRIPP, IWMI - International Water Management Institute, South Africa, k.villholth@cgiar.org), gabrieleckstein@law.tamu.edu), Ralf Klingbeil (Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Germany, r.klingbeil@gmx.de)

Session 7.06: Groundwater protection and governance: examples of groundwater protection models , and the role of the private sector
Groundwater plays a strategic role in our societies as it is often a prime source of water for communities, agriculture and industries. In a global context of growing water needs, resource use and rising pollution threats, groundwater governance and groundwater protection have to be strengthen. Depending on the regulatory framework, socio-economic, hydrogeological contexts, etc., stakeholders engagement models of groundwater protection can really, and must surely differ.
This session is open to contributions presenting diverse models and cases studies on groundwater protection implementation, from developed and developing countries.

In some areas, the private sector can have a key role to play to protect, quantitatively and qualitatively, groundwater resources, not only to secure their operations but also because tapping water from a non-protected aquifer can seriously impact their reputation. Several tools or methods have emerged during the last decade to help the private sector to drive and implement their water stewardship into their corporate organisation.
The session is thus also open to contribution presenting the different tools and methods, comparing the different approach as well as case studies where private sector engagement has been predominant in groundwater protection initiatives. It also aims at comparing these tools/methods with thoses developed by other stakeholders (such as public water supply, agriculture, etc.), and favoring their improvement.

Conveners: Heru Hendrayana (Gadjah Mada University, Indonesia, heruha@yahoo.com), Olivier Beon (Danone Waters, France, olivier.beon@danone.com)

Session 7.07: Transdisciplinary and participatory approaches in groundwater research and management
There is a growing consensus among scientists, policy makers and society in general that the huge challenges of a changing world – not only climate change, but also land and water-use changes arising from social, political and demographic pressures -- can only be solved by through collaboration between scientists from different disciplines.  Moreover, there is growing agreement that science needs to take stakeholder knowledge and public opinion into account if the results of research are to be translated into meaningful and implementable policy. These concepts are known as “participatory research” or “transdisciplinarity” (or simply “science with society”).  Participation is a key concept of regulatory initiatives such as the European Water Framework Directive, and forms and essential concept within Integrated Water Resources Management. In particular in the field of groundwater, the world's largest, best protected and most exploited freshwater resource, the inter-dependence of nature and mankind is of fundamental importance. In this session, contributions that describe experience of participatory, transdisciplinary collaboration between groundwater science and society will be prsented.

Conveners: Roland Barthel (University of Gothenburg, Sweden, roland.barthel@gvc.gu.se), Stephen Foster (IAH Past President & GWP Senior Adviser, iahfoster@aol.com), Karen G. Villholth, (IWMI, International Water Management Institute, Pretoria, South Africa, k.villholth@cgiar.org), Frank van Steenbergen (MetaMeta Research, fvansteenbergen@metameta.nl)

TOPIC 8 - PROGRESS IN CONCEPTUAL MODELS, TOOLS AND METHODS

Session 8.01: Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing as an innovative method in hydrogeology and geothermal energy
For several years, Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing has been widely used in hydrogeology to characterize infiltration within the vadose zone, hyporheic flows, and groundwater discharge in lakes or towards the sea. In addition, this emerging tool has also been used to monitor temperature changes during hydraulic tests, geothermal tracer tests, and for monitoring oil recovery. In the present session, we are seeking contributions about the theory, application, and data analysis of Distributed Temperature Sensing applications in hydrogeology and geothermal energy. Such applications may be about the improvement of reservoir monitoring or the characterization of thermal and hydrological processes in the sub-surface.

Conveners: Olivier Bour (University of Rennes 1, Olivier.Bour@univ-rennes1.fr), Victor Bense (Wageningen University, victor.bense@wur.nl) and John Selker (Oregon State University, John.Selker@OregonState.edu)

Session 8.02: Groundwater Development and Protection in Coastal and Volcanic Environments with Complex Geological Structures
Session Description:  Groundwater resources in coastal and insular contexts are often of high strategic importance but are threatened by natural processes (seawater intrusion, floods, tsunamis, subsidence, sea-level variations, climate changes, and land erosion), and anthropogenic activities (overpumping, drainage, land reclamation, urbanization, and contamination). This session aims at reviewing the latest advances in groundwater investigations, and management criteria in coastal and insular environments characterized by complex geological contexts such as volcanic, sedimentary, karstic, and hard rocks.
Topics of interest include: a. The use of advanced monitoring networks, b. The definition of hydro-geophysical, conceptual, and numerical modeling and model validation focused on Fresh-Salt-water interface, c. Management modeling of integrated water resources in the particular context of coastal areas, considering (1) local hydrogeological catchment characteristics, and (2) quantity and quality demands for different purposes, so as to grant a real sustainable economic development for present inhabitants and future generations.

Conveners: Alexandre Pryet (ENSEGID, Bordeaux, France alexandre.pryet@ensegid.fr), Giovanni Barrocu (University of Cagliari barrocu@gmail.com // barrocu@unica.it)

Session 8.03: Geometrical structure and hydrogeological properties of Hard-Rock aquifers.
Hard-rock aquifers (i.e. fractured granitic and metamorphic rocks) cover about 35% of the continental surface and constitute a valuable water resource, particularly for many developing and emerging countries. However, determining their geometrical structures as well as their hydrogeological properties (permeability, porosity, recharge…) still remains a challenge which makes difficult the evaluation of these resources and their sustainable management.
The topic of the present session seeks contributions about new methodologies, technologies, conceptual models or modelling techniques developed to improve the knowledge of these fractured aquifers. Expected applications both at borehole or watershed scales concern techniques for evaluating their properties, their geometries, tools supporting the groundwater management, etc.

Conveners: Benoît Dewandel (BRGM, France, b.dewandel@brgm.fr), Üwe Troeger (University of Berlin, Germany, uwe.troeger@tu-berlin.de) & John Sharp (USA, University of Texas, jmsharp@jsg.utexas.edu)

Session 8.04: Isotopic and residence time tracers
While isotopic and chemical tracers are known to be powerful tools to refine groundwater conceptual models and their management strategies, including protection actions, most of abstraction plan rely on the general knowledge of water masses flow. However, recent progress in analytical techniques and in use of isotopic and chemical tracers may provide a substantial support for identifying and modelling flow paths and transit time distributions in aquifers.
This session will focus on both recent development and particular case studies using isotopic and residence time tracers to investigate water flow and contaminant transport in aquifers. This comprise among other things the use of new tracer measurement technologies (e.g. relevance of continuous field monitoring using laser spectrometers), the application of innovative tracers and the development of new modeling strategies to derive the distributions of residence times.

Conveners: Florent Barbecot (Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada, barbecot.florent@uqam.ca), Przemysław Wachniew (AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland, wachniew@agh.edu.pl), Luc Aquilina (Rennes I University, France, luc.aquilina@univ-rennes1.fr), Vincent Marc (UMR EMMAH, Avignon University, France, vincent.marc@univ-avignon.fr)

Session 8.05: Karst aquifers
Increasing stress on water resources has emphasized the need for alternative groundwater resources, among which karst aquifers. The latest are increasingly studied and this session will be the opportunity to provide a state of the art on karst hydrogeology focused on techniques and methodologies able to deliver to the Society the expected responses.
Abstracts on the following topics are welcome: innovative metrology (flow and quality monitoring, tracing experiments, temperature measurements, geophysics.), groundwater and surface water flows (interaction), solute transport (fate and transport of contaminants, contaminants as tracers, sediment transport, etc), modelling techniques, water management including active management. Submissions on case studies especially on Mediterranean karst systems are welcome.

Conveners: J.C. Maréchal (BRGM, France, jc.marechal@brgm.fr), B. Mahler (University of Texas Jackson School of Geosciences and USGS, USA, bjmahler@usgs.gov), M. Sauter (Göttingen University, Germany, Martin.Sauter@Geo.Uni-Goettingen.de)

 

Session 8.06: Verification of conceptual patterns and expected natural effects of regional groundwater flow by interpretation of relevant field observations + RGFC Competition
The session's objective is to encourage comparisons between theoretical predictions of flow patterns and their natural effects in a given study area, on one hand, and measurable parameters of their real-life flow-fields and empirically observed manifestations of interaction between moving groundwater and its environment in the same area, on the other. Such comparisons, if used iteratively, may be developed into a novel method of groundwater flow-system evaluation. Papers are welcome from any specialty dealing with regional groundwater flow and groundwater dependent processes and phenomena, such as: geothermics, soil salinization, wetland hydrology, surface and subsurface ecology, hydrochemistry, slope stability, petroleum and metallic mineral accumulation, and so on.

Conveners: Judit Mádl-Szőnyi (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary, szjudit@ludens.elte.hu), René Lefebvre (Centre Eau Terre Environnement, INRS, Canada, rene.lefebvre@ete.inrs.ca), Carlos Molano (Universidad de los Andes, Colombia, cmolano@uniandes.edu.co) John Molson (Université Laval, Canada, john.molson@ggl.ulaval.ca), Jose Joel Carrillo-Rivera (UNAM, Mexico, joeljcr@igg.unam.mx) and Adam Toth (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary, adam.geophysics@gmail.com)

Session 8.07: Hydrogeophysics: innovative non-invasive technologies for groundwater resources exploitation and management
Geophysical data from ground-based, borehole logging and remote sensing measurements are being increasingly used to provide qualitative and quantitative information about hydrogeological parameters and processes. Groundwater resources structure, hydrodynamic functioning, contaminant transport, recharge monitoring, surface and groundwater interactions, ecological and climate investigations are some of the hydrological topics where hydrogeophysics actively contributes and that will be discussed during this session.
The “hydrogeophysics” session will focus on both recent methodological developments and case studies. Abstracts on the following topics are welcome: integrative methodologies; relevant hydrogeophysical case studies; recent progress in equipment (ground based, logging, airborne, satellite) and in methods, measuring techniques and inversion schemes; hydrogeophysical monitoring; biogeophysics;

Conveners: Konstantinos Chalikakis (UMR EMMAH, Avignon University, France, konstantinos.chalikakis@univ-avignon.fr), Roger Guerin (UMR METIS, UPMC Paris-6 University, France, roger.guerin@upmc.fr), Lee Slater (Rutgers University Newark, USA, lslater@rutgers.edu)

Session 8.08: Mineral and Thermal water: an indicator of deep processes and source of economically valuable minerals
Mineral and thermal waters are groundwater which are mainly characterised by i) a special chemical composition, ii) a unique origin, iii) high temperature in the case of thermal water, and iv) high total mineralization in the case of saline waters and brines. Geochemical and isotopic studies of these waters shows that they can be an important indicators of deep processes taking place in the Earth’s crust nowadays or in geological past.
Active tectonic processes as earthquakes, stress accumulation in the deep underground upwelling of magma chambers are influencing deep fluids which induce changes in groundwater composition. The continuous monitoring of the chemical and physical composition as well as periodic measurements on samples of mineral and thermal water provides information of the occurrence of such processes. The application of these information for the discovery of ongoing processes as leading to earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, gas emissions, etc. as also the interpretation of the processes and effect itself is the one of the main of this session.
On the other hand, deep geological processes ongoing nowadays or taken place in geological past usually induce extensive water rock-interaction which considerably influence on the groundwater chemical and isotopic composition, their origin and mineralization. Mining activities, oil and gas exploration and exploitation, the use of geothermal energy, are examples for human activities of growing up economic relevance that come into touch with highly mineralized waters and brines. In many cases the specific chemical composition of such waters allows to recover many valuable minerals or elements, including critical ones. In this session presentations and posters are also welcome which shows the examples of mineral water utilization as a resource for valuable minerals, technology which are used to this purposes and future prospects in this field.

Conveners: Werner Balderer (retired, ETH Zurich, Department of Earth Science, Swiss Geotechnical Commission, Switzerland, balderer@ethz.ch, bawerner@retired.ethz.ch), Şebnem Arslan (Ankara University, Turkey, sarslan@eng.ankara.edu.tr), Jim LaMoreaux (PELA, Geoenvironment, USA, jlamoreaux@pela.com)

Session 8.09: Hydrogeoecology: a focus on groundwater ecology
Saturated underground layers, including all types of groundwater bodies from shallow to deep subsurface environments (shallow groundwater interacting with surface soil or water, sedimentary and karstic systems, deep water systems), host a significant part of the prokaryotic biodiversity and biomass on earth, complemented by numerous eukaryotic organisms. These play a key role in the cycling of major elements, particularly at the interface between water and solid matter. They modify the kinetics of chemical reactions, directly or indirectly, inducing dissolution or precipitation of minerals and steering natural attenuation of organic pollutants. Driving the cycling of organic matter and nutrients, groundwater organisms contribute to carbon sequestration or conversely to the release of greenhouse gases. They form a non-negligible part of the set of mechanisms governing hydrogeological evolution of groundwater. Therefore, these organisms reflect, contribute and respond to the status of the underground environments and the two-way interactions of organic pollutants/metals with groundwater microbial communities are potentially important drivers of Global Change. Improvement in knowledge about groundwater organism biodiversity, activity, distribution and evolution are keys to preserve the quality of pristine groundwater bodies, to remediate polluted or disturbed zones, and to rationally manage groundwater resources.
The topic of the present session seeks contributions about ecology of groundwater bodies. Targeted topics include: i) assessment of biodiversity (taxonomic and functional), activity and ecosystem functioning ii), contribution of the groundwater organisms to biogeochemical cycles, iii) identification and assessment of biological processes affecting geochemical quality e.g. bio-transformation of pollutants, iv) development and application of bio-indicator tools to assess groundwater ecosystem status and services and to be implemented in future groundwater regulations and policies.

Conveners: Aourell Mauffret (BRGM, France, a.mauffret@brgm.fr), Christophe Douady (University of Lyon, France, christophe.douady@univ-lyon1.fr), Christian Griebler (Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Germany, griebler@helmholtz-muenchen.de)

Session 8.10: Recent developments in groundwater modeling and mathematical tools in Hydrogeology
Groundwater modelling remains the standard approach to integrate the numerous types of data used for characterizing aquifers. It is also emerging as the approach to synthesize institutional memory on the recent history of the aquifer and to derive management policies. In addition, modelling is a standard tool for addressing emerging challenges, such as CO2 storage, fracking, enhanced geothermics. Proper groundwater modelling often requires reasonable assumptions on the governing parameters and their spatial distribution and variability. Presentations are welcome on model concepts, numerical methods, geostatistical approaches and actual applications.

Conveners: Jesus Carrera Ramirez (Instituto de Diagnóstico Ambiental y Estudios del Agua, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Spain, jesus.carrera.ramirez@gmail.com), Maria-Th. Schafmeister (Applied Geology, University Greifswald, Germany, schaf.hydrogeology@uni-greifswald.de)

Session 8.11: Hydrogeodesy: new surface tools to characterize and monitor active and managed groundwater systems
Recent development of ground-based and satellite gravimetry (GRACE and ground gravimeter) and deformation (InSAR, tiltmeter and strainmeters) have profoundly changed our vision of dynamic processes in groundwater systems on a wide range of spatial scales. Gravity provide access to a unique observation to constrain aquifer mass balance while deformation offers an image of pressure changes – powering fluid flow – applied on a reservoir. Both non-invasive tools are growing in popularity considering their high potential to remotely image aquifer structure and hydro-dynamical parameters, assess the impact of heterogeneity, improve model predictability skills and evaluate water management policies and their impact on groundwater sustainability.
The hydrogeodesy session will focus on instrumental and methodological developments, as well as case studies on the different applications highlighted.

Conveners: Laurent Longuevergne (Géosciences Rennes, Rennes 1 University, France, laurent.longuevergne@univ-rennes1.fr), Di Long (Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, dlong@tsinghua.edu.cn), Cédric Champollion (Géosciences Montpellier, Montpellier 2 University, France, cedric.champollion@univ-montp2.fr)

Special session KINDRA:

An accurate assessment of the state of the art in hydrogeology research and knowledge is the main aim of the KINDRA project (Knowledge Inventory for hydrogeology research, Grant Agreement 642047, www.kindraproject.eu), funded by the European Commission’s HORIZON2020 Framework Programme. Last year, a terminology and classification methodology on groundwater research and knowledge based on a keyword list has been realized. The Hydrogeological Research Classification System (HRC-SYS) has been developed by categorizing groundwater research in three main categories: 1) Societal Challenges, 2) Operational Actions and 3) Research Topics. Each of these three main categories include 5 overarching sub-categories for an easy overview of the main research areas. The complete merged list of keywords, selected from the Water Framework and Groundwater directives and from high impact scientific journals has been organized in a tree hierarchy. This year, the European Inventory of Groundwater Research (EIGR) is populating by groundwater national experts selected by the European Federation of Geologists, by inserting results of research activities, projects and programs realized at national and international scale among Europe.

Conveners: Marco Petitta (Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, marco.petitta@uniroma1.it), Isabel Fernandez (EFG: European Federation of Geologists, Brussels, Belgium, ifernandez.efg@outlook.com)

ECHN

Key Dates

0.192+0.204=0.396